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Radiology

X-rays :: Ultrasound :: CT Scan :: MRI

:: X-rays

If your doctor has scheduled you to have an X-ray exam, it is important that you understand why you have been asked to undergo this test and what steps are needed for a proper preparation.

A chest X-ray are often taken to check your general health and see if there has been any spread of the cancer to other parts of the body.

:: Ultrasound

Ultrasound (US) imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography, is a method of obtaining images of internal organs by sending high-frequency sound waves into the body. The reflected soundwaves’ echoes are recorded and displayed as a real-time, visual image. No ionizing radiation (X-ray) is involved in ultrasound imaging.

:: CT scan (CAT scan)

CT SCAN is an X-ray tube that rotates in a circle around the patient and takes a series of pictures as it rotates. The multiple X-ray pictures are reconstructed by a computer in axial slice images at different levels. Each level can be examined separately.

The scan takes from 10-30 minutes. You may be given a drink or injection of a dye, which allows particular areas to be seen more clearly. For a few minutes, this may make you feel hot all over. If you are allergic to iodine or have asthma you could have a more serious reaction to the injection, it is important to let your doctor know beforehand.

You will probably be able to go home as soon as the scan is over.

:: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI or NMR scan)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging technique. This test is similar to a CT scan but uses magnetism instead of X-rays to build up cross-sectional pictures of your body. It is used to view organs, soft-tissue, bone, and other internal body structures.

An individual is not exposed to harmful radiation during this test.

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